Running Redmine in the Cloud with Azure

    Introduction

    Regardless of the size of the team on a project, project management is necessary for planning, organizing and controlling resources. The primary objective of project management is to achieve all of the goals of a particular project, so it is important to have a clear view of the project status and the remaining tasks. This also allows the project manager to make decisions in early stages of the project or to change the delivery timeline.

    There are several software tools that help project managers to analyze data and display it graphically, such as Microsoft Project, SAP, Atlassian JIRA or Redmine. This guide describes how to easily create a copy of Redmine in the cloud using Windows Azure and the free BitNami Redmine virtual machine.

    Using the BitNami images is a great way to get you started on Windows Azure. They provide pre-configured virtual machines that are ready to run “out of the box”. This allows you to quickly evaluate a solution, such as Redmine, You can then use the Windows Azure tools to manage your virtual machine as you move into production. For example you can quickly increase the size of the server, create snapshot backups and monitor performance.

     

    Why Redmine?

    Redmine is a flexible project management web application. It is a Ruby on Rails-based application and supports several features that facilitate project management tasks: multiple project support, flexible role-based access control, issue tracking, Gantt chart and calendar, wiki, forums, and document management among others.

    This application can be used for simply tracking tasks in a small team or it can be integrated with source code management software in big teams working on software projects. One of the features that makes Redmine so popular is the ability to adapt the application to your needs.

     

    The BitNami Redmine VM Depot image

    The BitNami Redmine image for Windows Azure is available in the VM Depot catalog. This image can be deployed directly from the catalog or from the Windows Azure management console web interface. This section will cover how to deploy this image in Windows Azure, so you will need to have a Windows Azure subscription to follow along with the process (free trials are available if you don’t already have a subscription).

     

     

    Once you are logged into the Windows Azure management portal, go to the "Virtual Machines" section, then click on the "Images" tab, and on "Browse VM Depot" at the bottom of the page. You will be presented with a list of all the images available that VM Depot holds that can be installed from the Windows Azure management portal (see screenshot below). In addition to the Redmine image, you can find other useful open source applications packaged by BitNami (and other publishers), such as Alfresco, for managing documents or SugarCRM for managing customer relationships.

     

    redmine01.png

     

    Once you have found Redmine in the list of available virtual machines click the arrow in the bottom right to continue. Note that BitNami provides a number of different versions of Redmine. Unless you have a good reason not to do so you should choose the most recent version. The management portal will take you through the process of copying the virtual machine image to your subscription. Once completed, you will have the Redmine image in your “Images” section. Select it and click on the "Register" button.

    Now that you have registered your new image you can create a virtual machine from it. Click on “New” in the left bottom corner. Select "Virtual Machine" and then the "From Gallery" option. Go to "My Images" in the new pop-up window and select your new image. This will open a wizard that will guide you through the creation process.

    First, you should assign sufficient resources for the machine based on how many users are going to access the application simultaneously. Redmine does not require a lot of resources, so you can start with an “Extra small” virtual machine and then, if you need to improve its performance, you can simply resize the server. This ability to start small and scale as required is one of the advantages of deploying applications in the cloud.

    When it comes to configuring authentication on the server you have two options: using an SSH key or providing a password. The recommended way is to use an SSH key. This guide provides the information you need for creating the required keys. However, if you just want to create a quick instance of Redmine for evaluation purposes then you can go ahead and use password authentication.

     

    redmine02.png

     

    In the next screen, you can configure the domain name. For this tutorial, we selected “myredmine.cloudapp.net”. You will need to select a different one. Once you have completed the new machine wizard, click "Virtual Machines" in the left menu, on this page you can see the virtual machines current status on, after a few minutes, the machine will be running. But we can’t connect to it just yet.

    It is important to allow remote connections to the web application. By default, the only accessible port at this point is the SSH port (22). It is necessary to configure the Virtual Machine “Endpoint” to allow connections to the HTTP port (80). Note that if you use the alternative method of deployment (using the command line) these ports will have been opened for you, but when deploying from the management portal you need to open them manually. Select your virtual machine and click “Endpoints” at the top of the page. On this page you can add and remove endpoints (see the action buttons at the bottom of the page). Once you have opened port 80, you should be able to go to the application domain using your browser and see the welcome screen below.

     

    redmine03-1.png

     

     

    For more details on how to start the BitNami Redmine image in Windows Azure, you can find a step-by-step tutorial on the BitNami site.

     

    Initial configuration of Redmine

    Thanks to the pre-configured nature of BitNami virtual machines, your Redmine setup is already ready to use, however, you may want to fine tune some of its settings. This section will outline some of the most common changes people wish to make.

    First of all you need to log in to the Redmine application. To do this click the “Access my application” button on the servers landing page (see above) and login using the default username (‘user’) and password (‘bitnami’). This user is an administrator and can therefore access all functions of the Redmine application. Since this username and password will be the same for all virtual machines created using the BitNami images it is a good idea to change this right away. We’ll explain how to do this in a moment.

     

    Administrator panel overview

    Most of the configuration, not only in these initial tweaks but also while you work with Redmine, is performed through the “Administration” panel, accessible through the top menu when logged in as an administrator

     

    redmine04.png

     

     

    The main sections you will use are:

    • Projects: Allows creating, editing, deleting, copying and archiving projects.

    • Users: Allows creating, editing, locking and deleting users

    • Groups: Allows creating groups to classify your users.

    • Roles and permissions: Allows managing the available roles (which will determine which permissions your users will have in each project).

    • Trackers: Allows managing the types of issues you will be working with: Bugs, Features... Trackers are really useful to classify your issues.

    • Issue Statuses: Allows you to change the status of issues as well as define new ones. For example, you could create a new status type called “Waiting for user feedback”.

    • Workflow: Allows defining the available transitions between status types, depending on the role of the user.

    • Custom fields: Allows customizing most of the available entry fields in all of the forms (issues, projects, users, groups)... For example, you could add a new field called “Twitter account” for the new user form.

    • Settings: Allows changing the application main settings.

    • Plugins: Provides an overview of all the installed plugins and allows you to configure them

     

    Changing the admin user credentials

    To change the default user settings such as the password, email and login, click on the “Administration” link on the top menu and navigate to the “Users” section, where you should see the default admin user:

     

    redmine05.png

     

    Clicking on the administrator account (“user”) allows you to edit it. At a minimum, you should modify the password and email, but you can also configure the login name and language. Once you save this form you will be able to login with the new secure user (and, naturally, other people will not be able to login with the default user details).

     

    redmine06.png

     

    After that, you will be able to login with the new secure user.

     

    Customizing the registration mechanism

    By default, the application is configured to allow new users to register but requires an administrator to manually enable their accounts. This setting is also configurable and available under the “Settings” section of the administration pages. You can review the available options in the “Authentication” tab:

     

    redmine07.png

     

    For now, the most important settings to consider in this section are:

    • Authentication required: If enabled, this setting forces users to be logged in to use the application.

    • Self-registration: This setting allows you to specify how new users are registered. If you want to have full control over which users use your application, you should set this setting to “account activation by email” or at least keep the default “manual account activation”, which will force you to manually enable new accounts from the “Users” overview page. It is also possible to allow users to automatically register without manual activation, but this is not usually recommended.
     
    Configuring the application email settings

    The BitNami Redmine application does not configure email settings by default, so another important initial step is to configure the application email settings so it is able to send notifications or invitations to your users.

    For this purpose, you can use a free email service like Outlook.com, Office365, Yahoo or GMail. That should work for small or test deployments of Redmine, but if you have a larger installation that will be sending a lot of emails you might be better off with an alternative solution. The example below describes how to configure Redmine with GMail for sending emails through SMTP.

     

    First you will need to connect to the machine through SSH using your favourite client. If you used password authentication when you created the VM then you will use that password to connect to the machine.

     

     

    Once logged in you will then need to edit the ‘/opt/bitnami/apps/redmine/htdocs/config/configuration.yml’ file with your preferred editor and modify the email settings. If you are using nano (a really easy to use editor that comes pre-installed with all BitNami virtual machines) run the following command:

     

    bitnami@Redmine:~$ sudo nano /opt/bitnami/apps/redmine/htdocs/config/configuration.yml
    

     

    To use a GMail account, you can use the settings below (just change the email and password):

     

    production:
    email_delivery:
    delivery_method: :smtp
    smtp_settings:
    address: "smtp.gmail.com"
    port: 587
    domain: "smtp.gmail.com"
    authentication: :plain
    user_name: "your_email@gmail.com"
    password: "your_password"
    enable_starttls_auto: true 
    

     

    Please make sure that you have the enable_starttls_auto property set, otherwise the error message "(530 5.7.0 Must issue a STARTTLS command first ..." will be shown in the browser when you send a test email.

    For these changes to take effect it is necessary to restart the Apache web server, so run the following command:

     

    bitnami@Redmine:~$ sudo /opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart apache
    

     

    Managing users

    Redmine includes a powerful user management system that allow you to give different sets of permissions to members of your team on a per-project basis. With this flexible system you will be able to, for example, give manager permissions to a user in “Project A” while restricting him to being a reporter in “Project B”.

    The “Users” section on the “Administration” panel provides an easy way of adding, deleting and configuring them.

    Creating users

    To make use of your new issue tracking system, you will find it useful to have some users able to act upon the issues recorded. You can easily create them in the “Users” interface in the “Administration” panel. In this section, you will see a summary of all the existing users. When you first access this page you will only see the Administrator that is created when deploying the application, if you have been following along with this tutorial you have already seen this user:

     

    redmine09.png

     

    To add other members to your team, just click on the top right button labelled “New User”. In this page, you will need to provide some basic information about the user (her name, email etc.). Please take special care with the “Administrator” checkbox, which will configure the level of privileges the new user has. If you have already configured the email settings in your server, you can also enable “Send account Information to the user” to ensure they are notified of their new account and password.

     

    redmine10.png

    Navigating back to the “Users” overview page, you will now see the new user in the list. Note that you can take a couple of actions, lock and delete, directly within this list. We’ll look at locking and deleting in more detail in a short while.


    redmine11.png

     

    Creating Groups

    In addition to creating individual users, you can also group them for more convenient management. Groups can be added as a member of projects as if they were regular users. This results in all individuals in that group being added to the project. In addition, by adding a user to a group, the user automatically inherits its privileges.

    To manage your groups, simply navigate to the groups section using the panel to the right of the users list (also accessible from the “Administration” panel) and click on “New Group”, give it a name and click “create”.

     

    redmine12.png

     

    If you now click on the newly created group from the “Groups” overview page, you will be able to edit it. For example, adding new users to the group through the “Users” tab:

     

    redmine13.png

     

    Locking and deleting users

    When a user is no longer involved in a project, you may want to prevent them from accessing your application. The easiest way of doing this is by locking the user’s account. A locked user won’t be able to login to the application, neither will they receive notifications or be listed as a member of the project in the overview screen. The user will, however, still be listed in old issues and comments made by the user will still be credited to them. Locking a user is a reversible change, so if you need to unlock a user, you can simply click on the “Unlock” link. Doing so will have the effect of making it appear as though they were never “removed”.

    To lock a user, just click on the “Lock” link in the “Users” overview:

     

    redmine14.png

     

    Locked users are not listed by default in the user overview list. If you want to view locked users, you need to adjust the search filters to show the “locked” (or “all”) status (see drop-down at the top of the list). This is necessary if you want to unlock a user.

     

    redmine15.png

     

    Sometimes locking a user may not be the best solution. A common case is if you have the automatic account registration enabled and discover a number of spam accounts have been created. In this case, you won’t be interested in keeping those users around, even if in a locked state. This is where deletion becomes useful.

    Deleting users is also performed from the “Users” overview page and will fully remove the account. Any entries in the system that are associated with that user will now be associated with “Anonymous”. Please note that removing a user is not reversible, so use with care.

     

    redmine16.png

     

    Accepting new users

    If you kept the default “Self-registration” setting as “manual account activation” in the “Authentication” section, new users are able to register themselves to use Redmine and will be kept in an inactive status until an administrator manually accepts their requests. You can review which users are pending activation in the “Users” overview, by setting the status filter (see drop-down at the top of the list) to “registered”.

    The resulting list allows you to quickly take the action of “Activate”, which marks the account as active and allows the user to login to the system. Alternatively you can “Delete” them which removes the account. Unlike deleting a previously active account deleting an account at this stage will not result in any “Anonymous” entries in the application.

     

    Creating projects

    Redmine allows you to manage multiple projects with a single installation. It also allows you to specify configuration settings for each of them, such as the project visibility or configuring different sets or roles to users for different projects.

    To create a new project, navigate to the “Projects” link in the top menu and click on the “New project” link. A form will appear asking for some basic information:

     

    redmine18.png

     

    • Name: A printable name of the project

    • Description: Where you can write a description of the proyect.

    • Identifier: A unique identifier for the project. By default, it is created based on the “Name” so you do not need to provide any value. However, note that this is used in the URL for your project pages so you might want to make sure it is both meaningful and short.

    • Public: This setting configures whether or not the project is visible for all users. If it is unchecked, only the project members will have access to it.

    • Homepage: The link to the project in the Projects overview page

     

    The form also allows you to configure which modules you will use for the project.

     

    redmine19.png

     

    The basic modules included by default are:

    • Issue tracking: Enables tracking of the versions, categories and roadmap for the project.

    • Time tracking: Allows tracking the time spent when working on the issues

    • News: Allows publishing news related to the project

    • Documents: Allows adding documents to the project

    • Files: Allows attaching files to the project

    • Wiki: Enables the project wiki

    • Repository: Allows browsing the repository and view the latest commits

    • Forums: Enables the project forum

    • Calendar: Creates a calendar with the project issues

    • Gantt: Creates a Gantt diagram with the project issues

     

    And also you can select which trackers you are going to enable:

     

    redmine20.png

     

    For example, if you are creating a project for bug submissions, you could simply disable all but “Bug”

    After completing the form, you will be redirected to the project settings page. You will see that you can modify all of the configured settings with the exception of the “Identifier”, which cannot be changed after the creation of the project.

    Depending on which modules you selected when creating the project, the number of tabs will vary. Each of the tabs provides features for managing one aspect of our project, for example, using the “Members” tab, you can add users to your project:

     

    redmine21.png

     

    Note that in the right hand side-panel, you can search for users and add them. Depending on the role you assign to those users, they will have higher or lower privileges for that specific project. For example, “Admin” was added as a Manager (will have full privileges in the project), where “Demo User” will only be a Reporter and Developer. Please note that these roles are specific to the current project. The “Demo User” was added as a “Developer” and “Reporter” to the “Test Project” but could also be added as the “Manager” to a different one.

     

    Versioning your projects

    Another nice feature supported by Redmine is the ability to version projects. This makes it easy to plan different features for each of the planned versions. These versions can be managed from the “Versions” tab in the project settings. This tab will list all the available versions and provide a “New version”. In our demo project we don’t currently have a new version so we’ll create one now using a simple form to collect some basic information:

     

    redmine22-1.png

     

    redmine23.png

     

    After adding any versions, a new field labelled “Target version” will be available in appropriate places within your project (e.g. issues can be assigned to a specific target version).

     

    Categories

    You can also further tweak your projects by creating categories. Categories are really useful to classify issues, for example, based on different parts of your product (frontend, backend, documentation). As with versioning, you can create new categories from the “Issue categories” in the project settings. Simply click on “New category”, and provide a “Name” and an optional “Assignee”, to whom all new users with that category will be assigned:

     

    redmine24.png

     

    After adding a new category to your project, the “Category” field will automatically be available in your issues.

     

    Adding new Trackers and customizing the Workflow

    Trackers

    As previously mentioned, you can use “Trackers” to classify your issues. Redmine includes some predefined trackers (bug reports, feature requests and support requests) but you can add new ones as well. To create a new Tracker, navigate to the “Trackers” subsection under “Administration”. Here you will see the built-in Trackers included in Redmine:

     

    redmine25.png

     

    To add a new one, for example to classify all of the features requested by your customers, simply click on “New tracker”. You will need to fill-in some settings such as the name of the new tracker, the projects it will be used in and the fields that it will include. You can also specify an existing Tracker to copy its workflow. If you don’t copy and existing workflow you will have to create one from scratch:

     

    redmine26.png

     

    Workflows

    Workflows allow you to define transitions between states for items recorded in your trackers. Which states are available is dependent on the roles assigned to the user and the kind of Tracker in use. You can modify workflows or define new ones in the Workflow section. To change the workflow select a tracker and the role you wish to change and click “Edit”:

     

    redmine27.png

     

    You will see a set of tables that allow you to configure the allowed state transitions. Note that you can provide additional transitions when the user is the author or the assignee:

     

    redmine28.png

     

    This workflow definition is a powerful tool, for example you can specify that developers cannot close cases unless they are the ones implementing them (the assignee):

     

    redmine29.png

     

    In addition to defining state changes in the workflow, you can also specify which fields each role can modify based on the current state of the issue (see the “Fields permission” tab):

     

    redmine30.png

     

    Creating issues

    Issues are created to define tasks for your projects (bugs, feature requests, improvements) and easily track who will be taking care of them and their current status. You can review all of the issues associated to a project from its main page:

     

    redmine31.png

     

    Depending on the modules enabled when the project was created, you will see a set of tabs (Activity, Issues, Gantt...). For now, we will focus on the “New issue” tab. This tab displays a form for the filing of a new issue against the project:

     

    redmine32.png

     

    From this form, you will need to provide some information about the issue:

    • Tracker: The kind of issue being creating (a bug, a new feature...)

    • Subject: Concise and clear description of the issue

    • Description: A detailed description of the issue

    • Status: Current status of the issue. This will usually be set to “New” when creating it.

    • Priority: The priority of the issue

    • Assignee: The member of the project will take care of resolving the issue.

    • Start Date: When the task starts

    • Due date: The deadline of the task

    • Estimated time: An estimation of how much time it should take

    • % Done: The current progress of the issue (0% when creating it)

     

    You will also be able to attach files and register watchers to be notified when the issue changes. Once the form is completed and submitted confirmation of the issue creation is provided:

     

    redmine33.png

     

    The “Issues” tab in the project page provides easy access to all issues that have been created in the project. By default this page only shows open issues:

     

    redmine34.png

     

    The issues overview page allows you to filter by many criteria such as the status or the assignee.

     

    redmine35.png

     

     

    Working on issues

    A good way of working with Redmine issues track your progress against the issues as you work on them. To do that, visit the issue page and click “Update” and change the various options on the resulting page:

     

    redmine36.png

     

    redmine37.png

     

    • Status: It is recommended that you change the status if there is any change. For example, when you start working on an issue, you should set it to “In Progress” or if you finish it, you can mark it a “Closed”.

    • % Done: You will need to update this as the task progresses

    • Log Time: This is a really special part of working in issues. It allows you to have more visibility into where the time spent on the issue went. It is really useful to plan the estimated time of similar future tasks and to justify the time to your customers. To use it, you simply log the time spent, the king of activity, and some basic description. The spent time of the activity will be added to the current overall spend time, and you will be able to review the summary of all the tasks clicking on the “Spent time” link

    • Notes: You can comment on the evolution of the issue using this entry

     

    Once you’ve finished this phase of the work submit the form and your changes will be recorded in the tracker:

     

    redmine38.png

     

    If you use the “Log time” feature of Redmine you can view a report of where time is being spent on the project. For example:

     

    redmine39.png

     

    If you simply want to log time against an issue, rather than update the issue itself you can do so using the “Log Time” functionality at the top of the issue overview page. Clicking this link will open a window for you to fill in the spent time, the date, and a basic description. You can keep adding new activities and time logs by clicking on “Create and continue” in this window:

     

    redmine40.png

     

    If you think the predefined list of activities does not fit all your needs, you can add new ones in the “Enumerations” section of the “Administration” panel (which also allows defining new categories and priorities for your issues):

     

    redmine41.png

     

    redmine42.png

     

    Once the issue is finished, the last step will be to close it, which will usually also involve setting its ‘% Done’ to 100% or setting the status to “Closed”.

     

    redmine43.png

     

    Installing Plugins

    Redmine is highly extensible thanks to its plugin system. You can extend it with everything from code review tools to improved graphs passing through CRMs and improvements in time tracking. To install plugins, you will need to log into the machine via SSH using the username and password provided when launching it::

     

     

    Before installing a plugin, make sure that the plugin is compatible with your Redmine version. If you get the plugin from the Redmine Plugin Directory you can check the "Compatible with:" field for each plugin.

    Download the plugin and unzip it into your plugin directory (which is /opt/bitnami/apps/redmine/htdocs/plugins). The screenshot below shows the “wget” and “unzip” commands you need. Both wget and unzip are installed on the Virtual Machine you obtained from VM Depot.

     

    redmine45.png

     

    • Once unzipped you will need to install the required gems with the following commands:

     

    bitnami@Redmine:~$ cd /opt/bitnami/apps/redmine/htdocs
    bitnami@Redmine:~$ bundle install --without development test
    

     

    • The database will need to be updated as well, use the following command to do this:

    bitnami@Redmine:~$ bundle exec rake redmine:plugins NAME=redmine_contacts RAILS_ENV=production
    
    • Finally you need to restart the Apache server:

     

    bitnami@Redmine:~$ sudo /opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart apache
    

    You can check the plugin is installed correctly in the “Plugins” section under the “Administration” panel. This page also provides access to any configuration options the plugin provides:

     

    redmine46.png

     

    Integrating with SCM tools

    Redmine supports integration with different Version Control systems like Git, Subversion, CVS or Mercurial. For each project defined inside the Redmine application, it is possible to add your application repositories and follow them directly through the Redmine console. Redmine is capable of providing a basic Read-Only access to your repositories, but it can also parse every commit and bind each one to a specific project issue based on the commit message. As a result the ticket view can show the full list of commits relating to the issue. This significantly improves the users' daily workflow, allowing them do things like close issues with a special commit message. The VCS integration is extremely powerful and adds many features to the standard Redmine setup, it is beyond the scope of this document to go into any more detail than setting up a repository. You can learn more at the following pages:

     

     

    The tutorial below shows how to add an example GIT repository to your project.

    First, the GIT repository must be created in your machine and the proper cron entry added to keep the repository updated every 15 minutes. This is Read-Only mirror repository. The following commands will set things up for you, once again all the necessary tools are pre-installed on your BitNami virtual machine:

     

    bitnami@Redmine:~$ sudo mkdir -p /opt/bitnami/repositories
    bitnami@Redmine:~$ cd /opt/bitnami/repositories
    bitnami@Redmine:/opt/bitnami/repositories$ sudo chown bitnami .
    bitnami@Redmine:/opt/bitnami/repositories$ git clone --mirror git://github.com/railstutorial/sample_app.git my-test-app.git
    Cloning into bare repository 'my-test-app.git'...
    remote: Counting objects: 1203, done.
    remote: Compressing objects: 100% (530/530), done.
    remote: Total 1203 (delta 673), reused 1089 (delta 615)
    Receiving objects: 100% (1203/1203), 289.43 KiB, done.
    Resolving deltas: 100% (673/673), done.
    bitnami@Redmine:/opt/bitnami/repositories/my-test-app.git$ echo "*/15 * * * * bitnami cd /opt/bitnami/repositories/my-test-app.git ; git remote update" | sudo tee -a /etc/crontab
    

     

     

    Once you have a repository on the local machine you can add it to your Redmine project. Go to the "Repositories" section of your project and click the "New repository" link:

     

    redmine47.png

     

    On the resulting page choose GIT in the Source Control Management (SCM) drop-down, and add the path to your Git mirror repository created in the previous step. Then click the "Create" button:

     

    redmine48.png

     

     

    Your new repository should now be visible in the project Repositories tab. Click the repository identifier link to view the repository content.

     

    redmine49.png

     

     

    Summary

    The BitNami Virtual Machine image for Redmine allows you to track the status of all the tasks related to your project, specifying their priorities and deadlines as well as defining which developer is in charge of them. Some advantages of running your Redmine environment on Windows Azure include:

    • The ability to resize the server as needed. You can start with a small virtual machine and as your needs change, easily scale it up or down

    • Easily create full backups of the server, which can be used to create replicas to test upgrade procedures or to restore the full server in case of catastrophic failure

    • Provide great connectivity, important when you are managing a distributed team or transferring large amounts of code or data

    • Easily monitor server performance and manage security settings

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